Accolades

Erika Forbes and Jennifer Silk Named Association for Psychological Science Fellows

Jennifer Silk (left) and Erika Forbes have been named fellows of the Association for Psychological Science. The national honor recognizes “sustained outstanding contributions to the advancement of psychological science.” Their election to fellow status places them among the country’s most lauded researchers and teachers with over a decade of postdoctoral contributions.

Silk, an associate professor of psychology, and Forbes, a professor of psychiatry, both study the development of depression and anxiety in adolescents. Silk’s work looks at how teens’ emotional reactivity and regulation change during this crucial developmental period, and how these changes look different for people who develop anxiety and depression. Forbes studies reward circuits in the brain for clues as to how mood problems and substance abuse develop.  

“The prevention and treatment of anxiety and depressive disorders in teens is a timely issue, and Pitt has a longstanding history of breaking ground in this area,” Silk said.

“Being named an APS fellow is a great honor, and it feels even more valuable to be named at the same time as a distinguished colleague and longtime collaborator,” Forbes added.

Institutional Advancement Staffer, Pitt Alumni Among Philanthropy Up-and-Comers

Raymond M. Davis, a major gifts officer who focuses on the Florida region, has been named to Who’s Next: Philanthropy by local new organization The Incline.

Davis is a graduate of Walsh University and began his work in donor relations there. He joined Pitt’s Institutional Advancement staff in 2015 and is pursuing a master of studies in law degree at Pitt Law.

Who’s Next: Philanthropy recognized 17 individuals under age 40 who are making a difference in philanthropy in Pittsburgh.

Also named to the list were Pitt alumni Zack Block (LAW ’05), executive director of Repair the World: Pittsburgh; Sloane Davidson (GSPIA ’17), founder and CEO of Hello Neighbor; Pam Eichenbaum (A&S ’08), business development associate at Innovation Works; and Ryan Gayman (A&S ’12), accelerator manager at Social Venture Partners Pittsburgh and partner at CitizenCity.


Davis in a dark suit jacket

Institutional Advancement Staffer, Pitt Alumni Among Philanthropy Up-and-Comers

Raymond M. Davis, a major gifts officer who focuses on the Florida region, has been named to Who’s Next: Philanthropy by local new organization The Incline.

Davis is a graduate of Walsh University and began his work in donor relations there. He joined Pitt’s Institutional Advancement staff in 2015 and is pursuing a master of studies in law degree at Pitt Law.

Who’s Next: Philanthropy recognized 17 individuals under age 40 who are making a difference in philanthropy in Pittsburgh.

Also named to the list were Pitt alumni Zack Block (LAW ’05), executive director of Repair the World: Pittsburgh; Sloane Davidson (GSPIA ’17), founder and CEO of Hello Neighbor; Pam Eichenbaum (A&S ’08), business development associate at Innovation Works; and Ryan Gayman (A&S ’12), accelerator manager at Social Venture Partners Pittsburgh and partner at CitizenCity.

Russell Clark Wins Prize for Excellence in Advising

Russell Clark, a senior lecturer and undergraduate advisor in the Department of Physics and Astronomy, has been awarded the Ampco-Pittsburgh Prize for Excellence in Advising. Clark is advisor to all undergraduate physics and astronomy major and is responsible for training graduate teaching assistants for lab courses. The Ampco-Pittsburgh Prize, awarded through the Kenneth P. Dietrich School of Arts and Sciences, comes with a one-time $4,000 cash award.

Cynthia Sweet Joins Pitt as Associate Vice Chancellor for Economic Partnerships

Cynthia Sweet has joined the University’s Office of Economic Partnerships as associate vice chancellor for economic partnerships. In this newly created role, she will work closely with Rebecca Bagley, vice chancellor for economic partnerships, to advance University initiatives that aim to foster economic growth on campus and across the region. Among Sweet’s first priorities will be to guide and focus the corporate engagement office rollout strategy.

Sweet most recently was associate vice president of corporate and government relations at West Virginia University and was the founding director of WVU’s Corporate Relations Office. She previously served as senior university business liaison in the Office of Corporate Relations at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. 

Sweet holds a bachelor’s degree in geography with a concentration in economic development and international relations from St. Cloud State University and a master’s degree in urban and regional planning with a specialization in international economic development from UW-Madison.


clark

Russell Clark Wins Prize for Excellence in Advising

Russell Clark, a senior lecturer and undergraduate advisor in the Department of Physics and Astronomy, has been awarded the Ampco-Pittsburgh Prize for Excellence in Advising. Clark is advisor to all undergraduate physics and astronomy major and is responsible for training graduate teaching assistants for lab courses. The Ampco-Pittsburgh Prize, awarded through the Kenneth P. Dietrich School of Arts and Sciences, comes with a one-time $4,000 cash award.

Sweet in front of a dark gray background

Cynthia Sweet Joins Pitt as Associate Vice Chancellor for Economic Partnerships

Cynthia Sweet has joined the University’s Office of Economic Partnerships as associate vice chancellor for economic partnerships. In this newly created role, she will work closely with Rebecca Bagley, vice chancellor for economic partnerships, to advance University initiatives that aim to foster economic growth on campus and across the region. Among Sweet’s first priorities will be to guide and focus the corporate engagement office rollout strategy.

Sweet most recently was associate vice president of corporate and government relations at West Virginia University and was the founding director of WVU’s Corporate Relations Office. She previously served as senior university business liaison in the Office of Corporate Relations at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. 

Sweet holds a bachelor’s degree in geography with a concentration in economic development and international relations from St. Cloud State University and a master’s degree in urban and regional planning with a specialization in international economic development from UW-Madison.

Dietrich Stephan Named Life Sciences Pennsylvania's 2017 Thought Leader of the Year

Dietrich Stephan has been named Life Sciences Pennsylvania’s 2017 Thought Leader of the Year.

The award honors an individual “who has a clearly articulated and enacted vision for advancing the scientific and business prowess of Pennsylvania; has harnessed diverse resources to implement that vision; has advanced Pennsylvania as a hub of the life sciences and has established broad, diverse support for his/her efforts to improve the lives of patients.”

Stephan, a renowned human geneticist and entrepreneur, is a professor of human genetics at Pitt Public Health and chief executive officer of LifeX. The LifeX initiative aims to translate life sciences discovery and invention to the marketplace, focusing initially on fighting cancer, Alzheimer's, multidrug-resistant bacterial infections, obesity and diabetes, and rare genetic diseases.

The award will be presented March 14 at the statewide life sciences trade organization’s annual dinner in Philadelphia.

 

Geoffrey Hutchinson and Amy Murray Twyning Honored with Teaching Award

Geoffrey Hutchison, an associate professor in Pitt’s Department of Chemistry and Amy Murray Twyning, a lecturer in the Department of English, have been named this year’s winners of the Tina & David Bellet Teaching Excellence Awards. The award was established in 1998 to recognize exemplary teaching in undergraduate studies at the Kenneth P. Dietrich School of Arts and Sciences. Honorees receive a one-time cash prize of $6,000.

Chief Financial Officer Arthur G. Ramicone to Retire

Pitt’s chief financial officer, Senior Vice Chancellor Arthur G. Ramicone, has announced he will retire at the end of August, ending a 30-year career at Pitt. 

Ramicone began working at Pitt in 1988 as a manager of internal audit. He worked his way through the ranks and today oversees 14 departments, ranging from payroll to risk management. 

He is credited with implementing a number of new systems and upgrades over the years, including a data warehouse and a new travel management program, which itself has generated significant cost savings for Pitt.

“In the last 30 years, Art has made lasting contributions to the strength of this University,” said Pitt Chancellor Patrick Gallagher. “He is a leader known for his honesty, integrity and sense of humor — and for bringing great teams together to tackle the right challenges. As a result, the University finds itself in an enviable position of exceptional financial strength.”

Chief Financial Officer Arthur G. Ramicone to Retire

Pitt’s chief financial officer, Senior Vice Chancellor Arthur G. Ramicone, has announced he will retire at the end of August, ending a 30-year career at Pitt. 

Ramicone began working at Pitt in 1988 as a manager of internal audit. He worked his way through the ranks and today oversees 14 departments, ranging from payroll to risk management. 

He is credited with implementing a number of new systems and upgrades over the years, including a data warehouse and a new travel management program, which itself has generated significant cost savings for Pitt.

“In the last 30 years, Art has made lasting contributions to the strength of this University,” said Pitt Chancellor Patrick Gallagher. “He is a leader known for his honesty, integrity and sense of humor — and for bringing great teams together to tackle the right challenges. As a result, the University finds itself in an enviable position of exceptional financial strength.”

MBA Program Ranked as One of the Best for Return on Investments Nationally

The University of Pittsburgh's Joseph M. Katz Graduate School of Business is in good company. Katz’s MBA program is one of the best for return on investments nationally, according to a ranking from Social Finance (SoFi), a student loan refinancing company.

SoFi said Pitt’s Katz school, Harvard Business School and Stanford Graduate School of Business were the only three schools whose graduates have excellent salaries and relatively low loan obligations. This is the first time the Katz school has been included in the SoFi ranking, which is developed independently of school-reported figures and instead uses data from 60,000 student loan refinancing applications the company received between January 2014 and December 2017.

Katz’s MBA graduates received the sixth best return on investment and the program ranked 17th in highest salary. It’s the second best return on investment and fourth highest salary among public programs ranked by SoFi.

MBA Program Ranked as One of the Best for Return on Investments Nationally

The University of Pittsburgh's Joseph M. Katz Graduate School of Business is in good company. Katz’s MBA program is one of the best for return on investments nationally, according to a ranking from Social Finance (SoFi), a student loan refinancing company.

SoFi said Pitt’s Katz school, Harvard Business School and Stanford Graduate School of Business were the only three schools whose graduates have excellent salaries and relatively low loan obligations. This is the first time the Katz school has been included in the SoFi ranking, which is developed independently of school-reported figures and instead uses data from 60,000 student loan refinancing applications the company received between January 2014 and December 2017.

Katz’s MBA graduates received the sixth best return on investment and the program ranked 17th in highest salary. It’s the second best return on investment and fourth highest salary among public programs ranked by SoFi.

Sociology Faculty Member's Research on Racism Recognized

The North Central Sociological Association recognized a Pitt faculty member’s paper on the perpetuation of racism in the United States with the association’s Scholarly Achievement Award. Waverly Duck and Bentley University faculty member Anne Warfield Rawls cowrote “‘Fractured Reflections’ of High-Status Black Male Presentations of Self: Nonrecognition of Identity as a ‘Tacit’ Form of Institutional Racism.” Duck is an associate professor in the Department of Sociology within the Kenneth P. Dietrich School of Arts and Sciences. Published in the journal Sociological Focus, the article says that black men encounter racism even at higher levels of status.

Sociology Faculty Member's Research on Racism Recognized

The North Central Sociological Association recognized a Pitt faculty member’s paper on the perpetuation of racism in the United States with the association’s Scholarly Achievement Award. Waverly Duck and Bentley University faculty member Anne Warfield Rawls cowrote “‘Fractured Reflections’ of High-Status Black Male Presentations of Self: Nonrecognition of Identity as a ‘Tacit’ Form of Institutional Racism.” Duck is an associate professor in the Department of Sociology within the Kenneth P. Dietrich School of Arts and Sciences. Published in the journal Sociological Focus, the article says that black men encounter racism even at higher levels of status.

Pharmacy's Patricia Kroboth Wins Outstanding Dean Award

Patricia Kroboth, dean of the University of Pittsburgh School of Pharmacy and the Dr. Gordon J. Vanscoy Professor of Pharmaceutical Sciences, will be given the 2018 American Pharmacists Association-Academy of Student Pharmacists (APhA-ASP) Outstanding Dean Award at the association’s annual meeting in Nashville, Tennessee, on March 16-19.

The award recognizes a school or college of pharmacy dean who has made significant contributions to the APhA-ASP Chapter and promoted with distinction the welfare of student pharmacists through various community service, leadership and professional activities. The award was established in 2004.

Pharmacy's Patricia Kroboth Wins Outstanding Dean Award

Patricia Kroboth, dean of the University of Pittsburgh School of Pharmacy and the Dr. Gordon J. Vanscoy Professor of Pharmaceutical Sciences, will be given the 2018 American Pharmacists Association-Academy of Student Pharmacists (APhA-ASP) Outstanding Dean Award at the association’s annual meeting in Nashville, Tennessee, on March 16-19.

The award recognizes a school or college of pharmacy dean who has made significant contributions to the APhA-ASP Chapter and promoted with distinction the welfare of student pharmacists through various community service, leadership and professional activities. The award was established in 2004.

New Exhibits Include Works By Professor Emeritus of Studio Arts

Two current art exhibitions — one in Detroit and one in the Bronx, New York — feature works by Pitt Professor Emeritus of Studio Arts Paul Glabicki. An internationally acclaimed multimedia artist, Glabicki taught in Pitt’s Department of Studio Arts for 40 years and served as its chair from 2000-2003.  

HUMAN/NATURE: Selections from the Kim Foster Gallery is already underway at the Elaine L. Jacob Gallery at Wayne State University in Detroit and runs through March 23. Each artist, including Glabicki, examines the journey toward decoding the relationship between humans and nature, and how humans are organically drawn to consider this connection.

TICK-TOCK: Time in Contemporary Art runs Feb. 20 through May 5 at the Lehman College Art Gallery in the Bronx. Glabicki and the other artists were inspired by traditional and contemporary tools we use to chart time, from clocks and calendars to sundials and stopwatches.

New Exhibits Include Works By Professor Emeritus of Studio Arts

Two current art exhibitions — one in Detroit and one in the Bronx, New York — feature works by Pitt Professor Emeritus of Studio Arts Paul Glabicki. An internationally acclaimed multimedia artist, Glabicki taught in Pitt’s Department of Studio Arts for 40 years and served as its chair from 2000-2003.  

HUMAN/NATURE: Selections from the Kim Foster Gallery is already underway at the Elaine L. Jacob Gallery at Wayne State University in Detroit and runs through March 23. Each artist, including Glabicki, examines the journey toward decoding the relationship between humans and nature, and how humans are organically drawn to consider this connection.

TICK-TOCK: Time in Contemporary Art runs Feb. 20 through May 5 at the Lehman College Art Gallery in the Bronx. Glabicki and the other artists were inspired by traditional and contemporary tools we use to chart time, from clocks and calendars to sundials and stopwatches.

Faculty Member Inducted Into French Order

Pitt faculty member David Pettersen has been inducted into the Ordre des Palmes académiques (Order of the Academic Palms) as a Chevalier (Knight) by the French government. The honor, said Pittsburgh’s Honorary French Consul Jean-Dominique Le Garrec, recognizes Pettersen’s efforts in establishing a faculty exchange between Pitt and the Université Lumière Lyon 2, his contributions to the expansion of French culture around the world and his research and writing about French literature and cinema. Pettersen is an associate professor of French and film and media studies and the associate director of the newly renamed Film and Media Studies Program in the Kenneth P. Dietrich School of Arts and Sciences. He will be recognized at an award ceremony in February.